As we all scramble to adjust to a new way of living and working amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, telecommuting or teleworking has become the “new normal” for many. Not to be confused with the buzzing topic for early interventionists of tele-intervention or tele-health (that’s a topic for another blog, perhaps), Merriam-Webster simply defines telecommuting as,” …

So far in this series, you’ve learned about the importance of two interventions associated with positive outcomes for children and families. In Part 1, we explored strategies that emphasize caregivers’ awareness and interpretation of their own actions. In Part 2, you learned how to help caregivers identify and use everyday learning opportunities to enhance child …

Ever been in a home visit with a parent who is
simultaneously using his/her phone while discussing the child with you? There
are lots of ways that phones and screen time show up during visits. For
instance, parents hand their child a phone to keep him quiet or distract other
children in the home. Parents may pull out their …

Tantrums are a normal part of every young child’s life. If we are honest, we throw our own “tantrums” as adults. When working with young children, especially those with a language delay, we have to understand that tantrums are a mode of communication when emotions become overwhelming. Marci Melzer offers five steps to handle tantrums …

An important and ongoing part of a service coordinator’s job is gathering information from families about their child and how that child fits into the daily routines of their life. This information ebbs and flows, changing as children and parents develop together over time. By gaining insight into these routines service coordinators can facilitate an …

In Part 1 of this series, you learned about the first intervention, which focuses on the caregiver’s awareness and interpretation of his or her own actions. This first intervention emphasizes (to us and the caregiver) the power the caregiver has to positively impact the child’s development through interaction and action. In Part 2, we’re going …

You’ve got 30 minutes until your next visit. Sure, you could pull over in a parking lot and scroll through your email or social media, or maybe return that text that will take you about 10 seconds to type…OR you could listen to the new podcast, EI on the Fly: A Podcast about All Things …

Logan’s annual IFSP review is underway and you are excited to celebrate his progress. You’ve been working with his family for a year so you’ve seen the steady pace at which Logan continues to develop. When he first entered early intervention, he was only two months old and doing most of the things a two-month-old …

In evidence-based early intervention, our primary aim is to coach, rather than to “do therapy” ourselves. We teach families how to help their children. The most challenging part of coaching can be finding effective ways to invite parents to participate and join in the interactions with their child.

Location, Location, Location

As therapists, it is natural for …

Okay, when you read that title, maybe you were curious, wondering if you were going to learn about three new discoveries that will make your job easier. Or, maybe you did a quick eyeroll, thinking “Here we go, the next big ‘thing’ that I need to do.” Either way, I’m glad you’re here. While I’m …