0

Will, the service coordinator, is sensing that Malika, Jeremiah’s mother, is feeling overwhelmed after the assessment. Malika has agreed to proceedWoman with Toddler in Bunny Ears with developing Jeremiah’s IFSP, but when they get to discussing possible outcomes, she becomes quiet and tells the other team members to put whatever they think Jeremiah needs to learn on the plan. Will has two choices here: 1) do what Malika says and let the rest of the team take over, or 2) be responsive to Malika and help her be able to participate in the discussion. 

Option 1

If Will chooses option #1, the IFSP might be filled with outcomes that aren’t based on what is most important to Malika. Skill-based outcomes could pop-up that are based on what Jeremiah missed on the evaluation and assessment. It’s also more likely that the outcomes will be discipline-specific, meaning that the IFSP will have “PT goals” or “speech goals.” Without Malika providing input about how her family works, what motivates Jeremiah, and when he struggles, the outcomes are likely to be less meaningful to Malika and her family and harder to address in their daily lives. This is not the preferred way to write outcomes or the best way to begin the parent-provider partnership.

Option 2

If Will chooses option #2, then he is treading into more sensitive water. He needs to acknowledge what he is sensing with Malika and find ways to support her so that she feels like she has an active and important role to play. If she is overwhelmed, she may need to have her hand held (as Erin suggested in our last blog post). What should Will do?

Here are a few suggestions to help Malika and the rest of the IFSP team move forward with developing outcomes:

Check-in before you jump in – Will should probably check in with Malika to see how she’s feeling and if she wants to take a break or complete the IFSP at a later time. Just offering these options can alleviate some of the pressure parents can feel that they have to complete the plan at that moment.

Go back to previous conversations about the family’s priorities and concerns – Start the outcome discussion by revisiting what Malika previously shared about what’s important to her, her concerns and priorities for Jeremiah’s development. As the discussion continues, keep bringing it back to what you know about the child and family.

Summarize the assessment and ask Malika what she would like to address first – Give a few examples of Jeremiah’s strengths and areas of needs. Relate them to his everyday life to help focus the discussion and let Malika pick what’s most important to her to start with.

Ask: “What would make your life easier? What would you most like Jeremiah to be able to do?” – If you can pinpoint something important like this, it can get the ball rolling. Then you can help link what the team knows about Jeremiah’s development to the activity that Malika identifies. Helping parents understand how their everyday activities provide the context for their children’s learning starts here.

It’s okay if you end the day with only 1 or 2 IFSP outcomes – It really is. The initial IFSP is only a beginning; you can always add to it or make adjustments later when Malika is more comfortable with the process.

Ask for Malika’s input regarding service recommendations – As the team (including the mother) discusses services following outcome development, ask Malika how often she’d like support. Be careful to balance guiding her to be a part of the decision-making process and avoiding overwhelming her further.

The important thing to remember here is to be responsive to parent’s needs, as well as those of the child – we tend to be very aware of what children need but can overlook parents’ needs if we aren’t paying attention. Guiding the parent during this process does not mean developing the plan while the parent passively listens. It means being flexible in how you support the parent as he or she participates in the process. HOW you guide the family, HOW you facilitate the team discussion and HOW you weave together the family’s input with input from other team members are what makes the difference.

What other suggestions do you have for this team? What would you do if you were Will or one of the service providers?

0

64 comments on “Guiding Parents during IFSP Development

  • Cori Hill says:

    WOW, timely blog! I am going to be teaching a class on families in the next few weeks and this conversation really provides good tips.

    0
    Reply
  • Amy Cocorikis says:

    I love the notion of “check in before you jump in”! Planning on sharing with a group of 50 Service Coordinators during staff meeting next week. It’s great to have resources like this to spark discussion about practice rather than the usual meeting agenda items – thanks!

    0
    Reply
  • David Munson says:

    Hi Dana,

    This “blog log” was the subject of our lively staff discussion yesterday. Since we began using the Routines-Based Iinterview process with fidelity (about 1 year ago) this scenario is now foreign to us. In the past we would often experience a primary caregiver who would defer to the professionals around the table for outcomes on the IFSP. The RBI process involves families and guides them in such a manner THEY are able identify and prioritize the needs of THEIR child and family. We agree wholeheartedly with your last statement: “HOW you facilitate the team discussion and HOW you weave together the family’s input with input from other team members are what makes the difference.” We wish we would have known that (and had the skills to apply that) years ago! Thanks for your continued support of frontline early interventionists with valuable topics!!

    0
    Reply
    • Thanks for sharing how you all are using the RBI to guide families, David! It’s great to have a process like that to help parents be so involved in the EI process from the very beginning. How long does it take your staff to do the RBI with a family? Do they typically complete it in one visit, like at an intake? Are they also doing an ecomap?

      0
      Reply
      • David Munson says:

        Following intake and eligibility our first visit with the family is an overview of EI, rights/safeguards, and the ecomap. This is a critical moment in setting the stage for EI…explaining how infants and toddlers learn (in everyday routines) and that intervention takes place BETWEEN visits of the specialists. The Routines-Based Interview is generally scheduled for the next visit, or whenever the family can block out two full uninterrupted hours. When we were first trained by Dr McWilliam our entire staff balked at that time-commitment. We have since found the time is well-spent and yields incredible insights. Even the most quiet word-less primary caregivers become engaged and talkative, given the structure of the interview. This visit is followed by the development of the IFSP. Yes, the 45 day timeline pushes us hard but every one of us agrees that the benefits for children and families far outweigh the upfront sacrifice in time.

        0
        Reply
        • Thanks, David. This is really interesting. It sounds like you have several visits before the IFSP. I like the idea of really getting to know the child and family more before you write the plan. Surely that would result in a better, more meaningful IFSP. Thanks for sharing!

          0
          Reply
  • Ethan Chun says:

    What other suggestions do you have for this team? What would you do if you were Will or one of the service providers?

    If I were a service provider in Will’s shoes, I would try my best to let Malika know how important her input is for making decisions about her son’s IFSP plan. Furthermore, I would try my best to support Malika’s decisions and let her know how important of a member she is on the IFSP team. Moreover, I would try to alleviate any fears that Malika was having in any way that I could while highlighting her family’s strengths to increase her confidence. Finally, in regards to the options, I would take option #2 and try my best to be responsive to Malika’s needs in order to help her effectively participate in the creation of the IFSP plan. I would also try to ask for Malika’s input whenever possible when making important decisions for her family’s IFSP plan.

    0
    Reply
  • Meagan Romano says:

    If I were one of the service providers I would go with option 2 because this option is more family oriented which is what these services are based on. It should be focused on the dyadic relationship between the parent and child. If the mother feels overwhelmed then her mental state should be balanced before moving on to the IFSP. Simply just choosing the plan without the parents input would not help Malika feel included in her own child’s treatment which is not okay. This also would make it to where the plan does not include any of the goals Malika hopes her child will accomplish.

    0
    Reply
  • Krista Elizabeth Samreth says:

    If I were one of the service providers, I would utilize option #2 as I find it incredibly important for Malika to participate and be a part of the discussion. I believe it is important to acknowledge and understand what Malika wants for her child as she knows her child the best. The mother may feel overwhelmed and scared throughout this process, but I consider it critical for the team to hear and listen to her. With the IFSP plan in place, the team should provide Malika with all the information needed and answer questions she may have. The mother should feel as though she is truly supported and encouraged to take part in the process. This means being patient and takin time off if needed. I believe the service provider is a supportive and responsive team that provides additional encouragement during the process.

    0
    Reply
  • Serena Ranmal says:

    If I was a service provider in this situation, I would definitely go with Option 2. It is so important for the IFSP outcomes to be completely individualized to fit the family’s needs and preferences. If it is not, then the mother may feel that she has a backseat position in her child’s intervention when in reality, she should be driving the whole process as an equal team member. The mother knows her child best because she is with him everyday and she should be fully included in creating the IFSP. Option 2 may take more time but it is important to develop a bond with the mother so that the service coordinator can be a person of support for the mother and the child throughout this whole intervention process. Ultimately, this will improve the intervention and create lasting and beneficial impacts for the family.

    0
    Reply
  • Urooj Arshad says:

    If I was Will or one of the service providers, my priority would be to make sure the mother feels comfortable and feels like her voice and opinion does matter. Even if that means to take a break or have the family sleep on what they have talked about before establishing the IFSP outcomes, that is fine. I would want the family to be as involved as they are comfortable with, and I would want them to know there is no pressure. All the decisions made should be made according to the family’s priorities.

    0
    Reply
    • Great point, Urooj! I really like the flexibility you write about. Parents should never feel pressured by us and we have to be careful not to let our busy schedules insert pressure into our interactions.

      0
      Reply
  • Heewon Yoon says:

    In order to perform a family-centered practice, I would definitely choose option number two. I believe it is crucial to work together with the primary caregiver to achieve mutually agreed outcomes. If I was the service coordinator, I would ask Malika what her concerns are and what she wishes to be the priorities. I would also try to help Malika gaining her confidence by integrating her inputs while creating the service plan and letting her know she’s the expert of the child. If she feels overwhelmed by the amount or difficulty of the information, I would convey the information in a way the parent can easily understand and follow.

    0
    Reply
    • Yes, adjusting how you engage the parent, how you provide information, and how you build the parent’s confidence – all to match the parent’s preferences for learning and participating – are important skills to develop, for both service coordinators and service providers!

      0
      Reply
  • Lindsay Jurica says:

    If I was the service provider, I would go with option two. This is option is much more family-centered and I feel that is a big priority when developing the IFSP. Although it is diving into “sensitive water”, I think that is necessary for Jeremiah to get the best services possible. It is critical for the parent to feel they are included in each meeting. By doing so, they will be ore responsive the service provider. Malika knows what is best for her son and by including her in the sessions she is able to express her concerns and priorities. It is also important for the service provider to get rid of any deals that Malika may have. The service provider needs to not only be supportive of Jeremiah, but also be supportive of Malika and help her to feel as comfortable as possible.

    0
    Reply
    • I really appreciate the last line you wrote, Lindsay. That dual focus – on what is important and comfortable for both the parent and the child – is a key perspective to adopt. It affects everything, even beyond the IFSP. It’s critical for service delivery and transition too!

      0
      Reply
  • Jocelyn Colunga says:

    If I were one of the service providers, I would use option #2 because this makes the mom be apart of the team and apart her child’s plan. I feel like in order to have a successful plan for Jeremiah, his mother showed be involved in the planning because she knows her child best. Another important part that was brought up is being able to support the mother throughout this time and letting her know about her options.

    0
    Reply
  • John Tadros says:

    If I were Will, I would even go forward to suggest a third option. I would bring up the possibility of another close family member, like Malika’s mother or sister, help guide and support Malika during the IFSP process. They more than likely would have up to date information regarding Jeremiah’s condition. Malika may be more willing to open up to her closer family members and in turn could exchange ideas back and forth as to what milestones they want to see Jeremiah achieve. Granted, there must be some sort of consent from Malika to allow other close family members to be involved in this; however, I think the presence of the family will help alleviate her anxieties and fears. I would only suggest this idea after trying to understand her family dynamic. Parents in this situation need as much care and support as the child does. Regarding Option 2, it is imperative that Malika stays involved in the IFSP process.

    0
    Reply
  • Joyce Garcia says:

    Hello Dana,

    In order for the mom to be more involved and feel like she’s a part of the child’s assessment, I would definitely go with option #2 since Will believes she might be overwhelmed with everything going on. I don’t think any mom would feel comfortable not being a part of the plan for her child. As the saying goes, ” Mother knows best,” and since she sees her child daily, it would only be sensible to involve the mother in the child’s plan as much as possible in order to ensure that the child is getting treated properly and efficiently. I think it’s normal for a mother in a situation such as this one to feel overwhelmed, so knowing that she has support would only be beneficial.

    0
    Reply
    • Yes, great point Joyce. As much as we try to make the process easy for families, it is almost always new to them as they enter an unfamiliar system. That “newness” combined with finding out that your child as a delay or disability certainly could set the stage for the parent to feel overwhelmed, and rightly so. Our awareness of this and how we support the parent can make a huge difference.

      0
      Reply
  • Diana Cañas says:

    Good afternoon,

    I would definitely have to go with option 2. IFSP is family orientated and option is has a greater focus on the family/parents. If the parents are heavily involved then it is more likely that the child will have successful outcomes. Although it may it be the more time consuming and more involved option it is better for the family and child.

    Thanks!

    0
    Reply
    • Yes, good point! Option 2 probably is more time-consuming but that time is well spent. Taking the time to be responsive and engage the parent is essential to ensure that IFSP truly is individualized and meaningful!

      0
      Reply
  • Helen Varghese says:

    As a service coordinator, I would choose option 2 because its important to include the parent’s input in the child’s IFSP. A parent knows their child best so if the team members were to put whatever outcomes they felt were best for Jeremiah, it might be the opposite of what Malika might want for her son. IFSPs focus on the child but it also includes so much involvement from family members so it is important to keep their concerns in mind. As a service provider, it’s important to make everyone feel welcome and valued so that you can work together towards the child’s progress.

    0
    Reply
    • Great point, Helen! We often *think* we know what parents want or what children should do, but without the parent’s direct input, we can’t be sure. When we are wrong, that makes it so much harder for the parent to be successful supporting the child.

      0
      Reply
  • Diana Panameno says:

    If I were a service provider, one of the steps I would take to ease Malika’s concern about the whole process is to emphasize that this is a work in progress and a learning experience for the family as it is for the IFSP team. Furthermore, I would help Malika understand that her participation is a critical determining factor for the IFSP outcomes by explaining how each member of the IFSP team, from the professionals to the family, brings a unique understanding of Jeremiah’s development. Thus, if I was Will, I would go with option two because this best takes into account the family’s environment, their preferences, their needs, their culture, essentially, it allows the IFSP team to understand and implement the family’s natural environment in the IFSP outcomes. In promoting Malika’s active participation, Jeremiah’s developmental needs are better assessed.

    0
    Reply
    • Great point, Diana! Helping the family (and sometimes the other team members too) see that the initial IFSP is just the beginning is so helpful. The plan can be changed at anytime. I think this perspective takes some of the pressure off of the experience for parents – and other eager team members who might want to be sure their professional priorities are included.

      0
      Reply
  • Jenieve Chapa says:

    Wow! I love the suggestions provided. They were very insightful and can definitely help put the parent at ease. I especially like the suggestions “check in before you jump in” and “summarize the assessment and ask Malika what she would like to address first.” So I would definitely be doing those as a service coordinator. Additionally, I would go ahead and remind Malika the importance of her participation in the IFSP because essentially this is for her and her family. Her input is very important considering the goals on the IFSP are supposed to relate to the child and family’s daily lives and make life easier overall.

    0
    Reply
  • Kalina Lemaire says:

    Hi Dana,

    If I was Will, I would follow the path of option 2. However with that, it is so important to consider the current position of the mother (Malika), she seems to be struggling with beginning the process of IFSP and I think that something Will should focus on is helping ease Malika in to the process of joining the intervention team members and really making sure that her voice/opinion on what is best for her son Jeremiah is taken into consideration. One of the most important aspects that an intervention team needs to keep in mind throughout this process is that although they are coming in to aid the mother in taking care of Jeremiah, she is such a huge part of his developmental environment that she does need to be directly involved in the IFSP process. If Malika does need to take baby steps into this process, then approaching this at a slower pace just might be what needs to be done in order for Jeremiah to have optimal outcomes from the intervention.

    0
    Reply
  • Cami Hill says:

    One other suggestion I would make if I were the service provider is to remind Malika that she is an integral part of the team and the creation of the IFSP. Malika may not know or may have forgotten her role, thus believing that it is up to the other providers at the meeting to make the decisions. I would also remind Malika that she is the best expert on her child because she is with her child everyday. Even though the other providers at the meeting have expertise from schooling, they are not with the child on a day to day basis. If I were the provider, I would choose option 2. I love the idea of checking in with Malika before the IFSP meeting. I would want her to feel comfortable, confident, and competent going into the meeting and I would want her to know that her voice will be heard. By talking before the meeting, I could help Malika come up with things she wants to address at the meeting based on her priorities and concerns. Then, she would feel more prepared going into the meeting rather than feel like she’s being put on the spot.

    0
    Reply
  • Alex Posner says:

    If Will is an insightful, productive service coordinator he should choose scenario two. No, this is not the easiest pathway but this aligns with the goals of the ECI program to give families the tools to help their child with any and all developmental setbacks. While developing the IFSP, it is the service coordinator’s responsibility to check in on the mother and make sure everyone is on the same page. Malika’s response to the speed at which the assessment was proceeding was a clear sign of frustration and/or confusion. She most likely does not realize how incorporated families are in this process. As Jeremiah’s mother, Malika knows what he needs most help with which is why families are so involved in the planning of an IFSP.

    0
    Reply
  • Kirsten Ellis says:

    I am currently enrolled in an Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention course. Based on the knowledge that I have gained thus far and my personal style, I would choose option two. I believe it is important that the ECI Service Coordinator makes sure that the mother is involved in the IFSP development for many reasons. Not only does it allow her to be involved and in charge of the progress that Jeremiah makes but it allows her to develop her confidence in stating what it is her son needs. Like we have learned, the family of the child knows the child best.

    0
    Reply
  • Dede Nguyen says:

    Hi Dana!
    I think option 2 would be the best route to follow in Will’s situation. Although Malika says she will go along with whatever the providers think is best, she seems anxious and apprehensive. In ECI, I believe it is imperative that parents feel comfortable and are informed about what their child’s treatment plan is. Although it may take longer, I believe that informing Malika about the process and making her feel comforted will have the best outcomes for everyone involved. When Malika feels a part of the team, she is able to communicate more effectively about what she wants for her child and how the service providers can work with her to ensure this as opposed to having her take a backseat.

    0
    Reply
  • Rachel Barnes says:

    If I were Will I would choose option #2. Although this is the harder, more time consuming, and potentially more emotional choice, it is definitely the right one to make. If Will proceeds with option #1 it may be the easier choice, but would most likely result in more issues in the future. I really enjoyed reading the suggestions that you gave the IFSP team because I think they could make Malika feel more comfortable and at ease with her IFSP team. A childs mother is an essential part of her childs development and needs to be fully on board and immersed in her sons treatment intervention

    0
    Reply
  • Sophie says:

    The suggestions provided were so insightful and helpful. If I were in the position of Will I would take option two because more than anything else in ECI it is important that the intervention tools being used can be integrated into the child’s everyday life. This is done through the caregivers working with the child when the professionals are not around. The caregiver should feel that they have a huge say in their child’s progress. Because Will is able to notice that Malika is feeling uncomfortable, he should take the opportunity to ask her open ended questions about the kind of steps that she would like to see her son take which will give her the opportunity to collaborate with the team.

    0
    Reply
  • Travon Brooks says:

    If I were in the shoes of Will, I would lean more towards the option 2. Our goal would be looking to gauge what Malika see’s as needs for her son. I would recommend recounting some goals she’d like to target for her son within the context of their day to day lives. We’re look to find successful strategies that can be implemented in Jeremiah’s day-to-day by his caregivers. Possibly providing some guidance as to what Malika may have alluded to in previous conversations. I feel as though if we empower Malika within the route of our goals it would help ease her feeling of being overwhelmed. Additionally, reinforcing the fact that the team is looking to work together to find the best plan of action for her son.

    0
    Reply
  • Rachel Liu says:

    I like the idea of “Go back to previous conversations about the family’s priorities and concerns “, it is a very useful and pragmatic solution for early childhood. I agree that service providers should be responsive to parents’ needs as well as children’s. I am taking a Psychology class in early childhood intervention and this blog helps a lot in understanding how IFSP works in guiding parents. Thank you Dana for your sharing!

    0
    Reply
  • Chiamaka Molokwu says:

    It is definitely important to make sure the parent, Malika, is engaged in the IFSP development. It is about her child after all. That is why I love the idea of summarizing the IFSP and asking Malika what she would like to address first. It can be overwhelming to absorb a lot of information at one time, especially if you are already stressed. I think another great way to help Malika feel less overwhelmed is to provide a written summary or a bullet-pointed summary. Written words or a visual aid, when it’s not a lot, can really help someone to remember and absorb foreign or new information better.

    0
    Reply
  • Maria Briones says:

    If I were a service provider on this case, I would make sure to have a conversation with Malika. I would want to listen to any doubts or worries she is having. I would also want to make sure that she knows that her role in her child’s development is important. It is important for the service providers to work with the family and make sure that the family understands what is happening every step of the way. The services being provided are individualized for a reason; the goals need to align with the family and child’s needs and priorities. As the service provider, I would also want to make sure that Malika feels emotionally supported throughout this process.

    0
    Reply
  • Victoria Garfinkel says:

    Hi Dana,

    I agree with option 1 not being the best way as it does not booster the parent-provider partnership. In option 2, I would also encourage checking in before starting to work on the IFSP plan as it may be stressful for the parent. The concept of continually reassuring and confirming with the parent that they agree and feel comfortable to move on with the program is a great idea. This would allow for the parent to really feel they have a big role in their Child’s development plan. It also boosters their confidence and leadership. I enjoyed reading your blog post and ideas.

    0
    Reply
  • Arielle Lutfak says:

    Hello! If I were one of the service providers, I would choose option 2. I would take time to sit down with Malika and ask whether she is truly ready to proceed forward with the IFSP. I would offer to walk her through the steps and give a detailed explanation of what is to come and emphasize the importance of her input. ECI is supposed to be a family-centered program and be focused on the family’s needs/desires/goals. It may be helpful to just really explain how valuable Malika’s opinion and insight is. I would try to let Malika know that we are a team, and if necessary, we can slow down the process to help her feel more prepared and ready to proceed

    0
    Reply
  • Taylor Ribar says:

    If I was a service coordinator, I would definitely resonate with Option 2 because I think Milika’s reaction is an indication that she is overwhelmed, and that feeling could cause her to disengage or distance herself from the process and the goals. It is important that Malika feels supported through this process and I think if you address those feelings and concerns when they come up it will lead to more positive outcomes for the parent and the child!

    0
    Reply
  • Leslie Nguyen says:

    Hello! If I was the service coordinator, I would go with option #2 because it can be inferred that the mom is extremely overwhelmed and maybe even scared and hesitate to proceed with the IFSP. As part of the team, it is important for us to make sure the family/or parent is heard since it is a family-orientated program. So althought option #2 may be time-costly, it is the best option in order to make the service individualized and make sure Malika’s opinions are heard.

    0
    Reply
  • Madeline K. says:

    If I was one of the service providers, I would go with option 2 and “be responsive to Malika and help her be able to participate in the discussion.” By doing so, it would follow through with ECI’s morals of prioritizing the family and allow Malika to still have a voice in her child’s life decisions. By summarizing assessments and making sure Malika could address whatever she wanted to first, it would allow her to have a voice in the situation, rather than just handing it fully over to the team.

    0
    Reply
  • Cameron C. says:

    If I was the service coordinator I would proceed with option 2 because it would allow me to prioritize Malika and her concerns. Option 2 would would ensure Malika is playing “an active and important role” in this process, which is one of the most important things for a service coordinator to make certain. I believe this option would allow Malika to feel more confident, since she is able to address her wants and concerns.

    0
    Reply
  • Marlene Huerta says:

    Based on what I have learned, if I was Will or was a service coordinator, I would go with option 2. Although this option is more sensitive and requires more work, it honors the uniqueness and morals of an Early Childhood intervention program, by including the family. Not only would this decision enhance the rights of the family, but it would also make the experience more worthwhile because Malika would be on board with the needs that are being assessed. I think considering and asking questions about what would make her life easier is extremely important because it emphazises how her needs are also prioritized and it validates her emotions. I believe that by doing this, and summarizing the assesments, she is going to feel less overwhelmed, more satisfied, and on board with the program.

    0
    Reply
  • Margaret Simmons says:

    Hello, If I was the service provider, I would go with the second option and be sure that Malika has an active and informed role when deciding her son’s IFSP goals. It is more important to help the parent to understand what exactly they want and need from the IFSP outcomes than it is to quickly finish the IFSP and move on to intervention.

    0
    Reply
  • Claire Eckardt says:

    The suggestions that were provided were incredibly insightful into the real-life issues that may happen as a practicing EIS. I believe that Option 2 falls more in line with the guidelines for practicing as an EIS. The field requires that parents are brought to the forefront of the decision-making process, and this example illustrates the importance of accommodating and educating them. Because Will was able to pick up on Malika’s discomfort, he can take the time to ask open-ended questions and help her to feel more comfortable with the process.

    0
    Reply
  • Asha Gomez says:

    I appreciate how you recognize the importance of understanding and showing empathy to the family. I think it would be easy to become overwhelmed in these situations, especially in the earlier meetings, but noticing cues from the caregivers can make you a better service provider. I like the suggestions in the options two category, so I learned a few ways I could potentially approach Malika. I would choose to check in with Malika and see what goals are most relevant to her and ask if has any specific aims. Talking through the next steps and how plans will be implemented can do a lot to settle anxiety. Breaking down the IFSPs into smaller steps or continuing with planning at the next session can leave room for Malika to process and think more about what she needs from the service provider. Great read!

    0
    Reply
  • Madison K says:

    If I were a service provider I would probably choose option 2. It is important for the family’s desires to be acknowledged. Malika may need help recognizing what her child needs, however, it is important for the caregiver to take an active role in the discussion of the goals for the child. This also strengthens the relationship between the caregiver and the provider. If they can come up with goals together, Malika may feel more empowered in being an active participant in her child’s services going forward.

    0
    Reply
  • Kameron O says:

    My suggestion that I have for the team is to focus on empowering Malika so that she feels as though she is in charge. Right now I feel like she is feeling very helpless and is having a hard time with people telling her what is ‘wrong’ with her child. I think if I were Will, I would summarize her child’s strengths and weaknesses and ask her which of the weaknesses she wants to focus on improving first while using one of the child’s strengths to do so.

    0
    Reply
  • Rozel T. says:

    If Malika is feeling overwhelmed and is not providing input I think that the action that needs to be taken is option #2. An important component of the IFSP is the goals and needs that the family would like to address as well as incorporating these goals into the day to day lives and schedule of the child and family. Without getting Malika’s opinion, the IFSP wouldn’t be catered to the families specific needs. I think it would be a good idea to ask Malika if she needs any clarification or if she needs a break before we continue the discussion.

    0
    Reply
  • Karen Gonzalez says:

    Parents always want what is best for their children in order for them to lead a successful life. As a service provider, one might think they know what is best for a child and give suggestions based on their input, but families are the ones that know their child best. Considering IFSP is a family-oriented process, family input, along with each member of the IFSP team, is a crucial determining factor for the IFSP outcomes and in creating a unique understanding of a child’s development. Therefore, if I were one of the service providers I would go with option 2 because it takes into consideration Malika’s concerns, wants, and needs for Jeremiah. It’s important for family members to feel comfortable and included in the IFSP process in order to support what is best for the child. As a service coordinator, I would ensure the process is facilitated for Malika so that she doesn’t feel as pressured or overwhelmed and is able to understand every step of the way. Malika should be provided with all the necessary information and have her questions answered. Essentially, because the IFSP is an active learning process, she should be eased into the process and feel supported and encouraged. Her input as Jeremiah’s mother is what would be the most effective in the success of the IFSP for her child.

    0
    Reply

Leave Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.