You are committed to helping families practice using intervention strategies during your visits. You truly believe that’s an important part of the intervention process. You’re very aware of your own interactions during visits and try hard not to “hog” all of the child’s attention. You redirect the child’s attention from you back to the parent …

It’s Thursday afternoon and I’m banging my head on the steering wheel after my home visit. Why? Because I’ve spent the last hour coaching this family to stop giving their two year old a bottle when she can drink from a sippy cup, straw, and an open cup. It’s not like we haven’t worked on …

On the blog, we often speak from the perspective of the EI professional. Switching up this “voice” a bit is not only fun, but it may help us understand more about the culture of some of our families. The tips I will share are from the millennial parent’s viewpoint in hopes of using their interpretation …

Teaming and collaboration are what we DO, right? We use teaming practices everyday as we connect with other professional team members to support the family in achieving their goals for their child. We understand that we’ll do our best work when we collaborate with caregivers as equal team members, valuing their perspectives and priorities on …

Ever had one of those experiences where you realize that, while you think you did your best, you completely forgot what you were supposed to do? Ever had that experience on an intervention visit?

I had that experience recently…I was on a first visit with a family and was planning to set the stage for how …

In last week’s post, which was Part 1 in this series, I began trying to translate the DEC Recommended Practices for Interaction into practices we can use with caregivers. Rather than focusing on how we can implement these practices with children, we need to really think about how to help parents, child care providers, siblings, and …

When we whittle early intervention down to its core, I think it’s all about interactions. Interactions between the child and caregiver, first and foremost…interactions between the child and the environment (toys, sofa cushions, spoons and cups, buttons on the TV remote, the family dog)…interactions between the EI practitioner and caregiver that facilitate positive interactions with …

Recently, my colleague, David Munson from Montana, shared a Ted Talk video that really moved me. This video features Heather Lanier, an essayist, poet, and mother, sharing her experience of raising her daughter. The video is about more than just a mother and daughter, though. Ms. Lanier digs deeper into our perceptions of differences and …

Rosemary, speech therapist, has been seeing Caleb for five months and it is time for his annual IFSP next month. She is worried she does not have enough information to provide developmental age ranges for the annual IFSP. According to the practice manual (Chapter 6, page 2), ongoing assessment is defined as:

“Assessment that occurs as …

Jenni has two options on every intervention visit:

Option 1: She can work directly with the child while the child’s caregiver observes nearby, or

Option 2: She can provide instruction to both the caregiver and the child by facilitating their interactions with each other during naturally occurring, developmentally enhancing activities.

The first option is probably easier, because in …