An important and ongoing part of a service coordinator’s job is gathering information from families about their child and how that child fits into the daily routines of their life. This information ebbs and flows, changing as children and parents develop together over time. By gaining insight into these routines service coordinators can facilitate an …

I’ve been thinking a lot about routines-based intervention lately. In particular, I’ve been thinking about (and experiencing) what happens when a family doesn’t invite you into their daily routines. What do you do when the space the family makes available to you is small? Not physical space, but family life space. When the only activity …

When we whittle early intervention down to its core, I think it’s all about interactions. Interactions between the child and caregiver, first and foremost…interactions between the child and the environment (toys, sofa cushions, spoons and cups, buttons on the TV remote, the family dog)…interactions between the EI practitioner and caregiver that facilitate positive interactions with …

Assessments continue to evolve in a variety of settings including the medical and educational fields. Though these assessments look and feel different, there is one very large commonality.  True individualization is ultimately valued. As we move toward conducting functional assessments, we have to learn how to gather information differently. Rather than interviewing the parent straight …

Jenni has two options on every intervention visit:

Option 1: She can work directly with the child while the child’s caregiver observes nearby, or

Option 2: She can provide instruction to both the caregiver and the child by facilitating their interactions with each other during naturally occurring, developmentally enhancing activities.

The first option is probably easier, because in …

How much do I value families’ everyday routines in being able to positively influence children’s development? So very much. Yet… how often do I find myself on a home visit either: 1) only talking with a family about their routines, or 2) engaging with the family in only the routine of play? Too often!

Values versus …

In Part 1 of this series, we met Phoebe, a service coordinator, and Wyatt’s family. Wyatt had just been referred to early intervention, and his family was eager to begin services but feeling overwhelmed by the process and their son’s new diagnosis of cerebral palsy. We began the discussion about the DEC Recommended Practices (2014) under …

Nicholas visits with Mia and her grandmother, Mrs. Wilson, during breakfast. Mrs. Wilson loves to cook and would like to involve Mia but she isn’t sure how. When she’s tried, Mia pulls her hand away or arches her back instead of touching the ingredients. Mrs. Wilson knows that she should help Mia touch different textures …

As the idea of conducting functional assessment takes root here in Virginia, there have been some worries about what it means. Does it mean that we won’t do our more traditional assessment anymore? How will we determine a child’s age-equivalency? How will we get all of the information we need? Who will do the functional …

I have a confession…I don’t actually think we should spend so much time talking with families about their concerns. I think we should ask once, so that we have it for Section II of the IFSP, then leave it alone. Instead, I think we should focus much more on the family’s priority for their child’s …