Early Intervention Strategies for Success

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  • Weathering the Storm: How Service Coordinators Manage Difficult Situations(current)
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TornadoEarly interventionists know service coordinators wear several hats. We are advocators, coordinators, problem solvers, and mediators.   Service coordinators are leaders in the IFSP process and active listeners to parents and providers.   We have to be creative and sometimes think outside the box to help children reach their greatest potential.

Service coordination has many rewards and challenges.  A few of the rewards we encounter include empowering our families and watching them advocate for themselves. It is also rewarding connecting families to resources and watching those resources enhance the life of the family.   Along with the rewards also come conflicts.  We deal with conflicts and manage difficult situations while keeping the process family focused.  When team members (including the family) disagree the potential for conflict arises. A service coordinator handles these situations keeping the perspective on the priorities of the family and facilitating decisions that are in the best interest of the child and family.

So how do we begin to manage difficult situations?

Discuss with the family any changes within the family routine or family priorities that would impact service provisions. 

Asking about changes that may be taking place can open up a new line of communication with a family.  When a family is able to discuss changes whether positive or negative it empowers the family to make decisions about services that would be beneficial to the child as well as the family.  This form of communication will assist in determining if services need to be reviewed, if outcomes need to be updated or changed, or if other supports and services need to be put in place.

Make sure you understand what the issue or concern really is.

Talk with the parent or the provider one on one to clarify issues and concerns. This conversation should be concrete, direct (in a professional manner) and clear.   Prior to IFSP meetings have a detailed conversation with the parent and provider to ensure that you are prepared going into the IFSP meeting in case there are situations that need to be addressed.

Three Women MeetingDiscuss ways to handle issues as a team.

Help the provider or family member figure out ways to deal with the situation so that everyone is comfortable with the outcomes. In most cases helping the family and/or provider figure out how to solve the issue themselves will not only give them skills to handle situations in the future but also empower them to speak out. A service coordinator’s job is to help facilitate the discussion in an honest and direct manner and model the ways to come to a resolution.

In cases where there are disagreements among team members and a decision is unable to be reached, it is alright to end an IFSP meeting,  take a break and reschedule the IFSP meeting for another day.

This will give a chance for all team members to step back, think about everything that has been said and come back together calmly to make a decision.  This will also give the service coordinator a chance to discuss the situation with all team members separately and revisit the facts.

Consider the following questions: 

What strategies do you use when facing conflicts?

How might you implement one of the above strategies when faced with a conflict or difficult situation?

57 comments on “Weathering the Storm: How Service Coordinators Manage Difficult Situations

  • Cori says:

    You know, I agree that a direct, professional approach seems to be the most effective. When SCs clarify, restate the problem and then coach families and team members to resolve the conflict, the SCs is teaching skills that can be used throughout the life span.

    Reply
  • Ethan Chun says:

    What strategies do you use when facing conflicts?
    How might you implement one of the above strategies when faced with a conflict or difficult situation?

    When facing conflicts in group settings, I think the best thing to do is to evaluate each different side’s opinions as a group and come to a consensus and agreement on what the best decision is based on the array of choices. Moreover, I think different sides to an argument can get confused as to how each group is thinking which is why many disagreements and conflicts arise. Furthermore, I think it is important to get each individual’s opinion as well as why and how they came to certain conclusions. Finally, if I were a service provider, I think I would implement the “make sure you understand what the issue or concern really is” strategy because I believe a lot of communication can distort how families portray what they really want or need. In conclusion, I would implement this strategy in a difficult situation by remembering to clarify what I think the family is trying to portray with what they are actually saying to me.

    Reply
    • Yes, considering all sides of the disagreement is key here. Thanks Ethan!

      Reply
    • Tamanna Kaur says:

      I would stay calm! I feel as if most times being upset is the problem causing attitude instead of first remaining focusing on the issue at hand. Also focusing on all sides of the disagreement is crucial to make sure everyone is heard and given a fair chance to explain their side. It would be the first step of coming to a middle ground

      Reply
  • Sania Razzak says:

    I am taking a course called Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention. If I was a service provider and was faced with conflict I would first calm down and try to understand every part of the conflict. Then I would look up solutions or resources and come up with plans that I can talk about with the family. I would mention the pros and cons of the plan. I really do like the strategy of handling the situation with the family. It is really important that they are able to solve issues and be able to speak out. This will help them when you are not present and as a service provider, it’s important to help the family and children become independent.

    Reply
  • Krista Elizabeth Samreth says:

    Hello. I am also taking an Early Childhood Intervention class. If I were a service provider, I would truly need to listen and understand the different perspectives others may have. Most importantly, we must listen to the family and their concerns. Our primary focus is the child, and what the family needs/wants. As well, it is difficult sometimes as individual may hear what others believe in doing instead of actually listening. Second, I would like to hear the input others may have on how to deal with the conflict/situation at hand. A diverse group of people can bring about even better solutions than we can expect. As the service provider, it is important to facilitate honest and open communication between the team and family. Ultimately, resolving the issue and finding the best solution is the wanted outcome.

    Reply
    • Great suggestion to hear the input of other team members. Sometimes it can be hard to reach out to others when struggling with a difficult situation but that’s exactly when team support can be so beneficial!

      Reply
  • Angie auyeung says:

    When faced with challenges, I always try to obtain the viewpoints of all members and try to keep a unbiased and outsider perspective to help resolve the situation. Putting in one’s bias or opinions can always hinder the process of finding a resolution. I would try to discuss other options with the family, so that they understand there are other choices that can be made and discuss the benefits or consequences of each choice. When faced with a difficult conflict, I think a really good strategy to implement from above would be make sure you understand what the concern really is because if you don’t understand the family’s concern, it could lead to a much longer process and more frustration on both parties when trying to find a compromise. By discussing the issue in the beginning, it will make it easier on the family and the service coordinator to find a solution.

    Reply
    • Yes, trying your best to remain objective and listen to all points of view is so important. Repeating back what you think you heard or what you understand the problem to be is a great place to begin!

      Reply
  • Serena Ranmal says:

    If I were in a conflict as a service coordinator, I would first get into a calm state. It is very easy for any human being to become very frustrated and distressed while in a conflict or while trying to solve a difficult problem. Because service coordinators work with all kinds of families and children everyday, it is important to have a confident and calm attitude because the family and child feed off your aura. If they see someone who is frustrated and distressed, the family is also likely to get frustrated because they see the person who is helping them as that. Having a calm demeanor and being confident that you are going to be able to solve the problem is the first step of solving any conflict. With this confidence, you can go into the conflict feeling more positive that you will be able to solve it with the help of the support you need.

    Reply
  • Heewon Yoon says:

    If I was a service provider, I would first try to listen to the parent to let them know they are still valued as a member of the team despite disagreements and conflicts. I believe effective communication is very important to enhance team functioning and further progress. In order to achieve this, I would try to hear the opinions of both sides. I also think it is important to not steer away from the main focus of the meeting(making a plan that is best for the child and the family) and still respect each other in any conversations. After listening to the parent, I would acknowledge their good intentions and goals. Then, I would give them other suggestions, while not necessarily trying to convince them or correct them.

    Reply
    • You’ve done a great job of describing the role that service coordinators play during team meetings. Providing information while remaining objective, respectfully hearing all team members’ input, listening to the parent, keeping the meeting in focus and on track – these are such important jobs of the team leader!

      Reply
  • Olivia Courtney says:

    When I am facing conflict, I always listen to the other person’s perspective and then respond when I have an understanding of what they are trying to communicate. It is very easy to tune out the individual you are supposed to be listening to and, rather, distracting yourself while thinking of your own response. This completely defeats the purpose of having the conversation to resolve the situation in the first place. This is why I really appreciated the strategy that placed emphasis on having an understanding of the issue/concern. By having that, you are able to respond appropriately and provide assistance or resources that will genuinely help the family overcome or better understand the issue. There is nothing more frustrating than having a serious conversation with someone, listening to their response, and realizing they have no clue as to what is going on. I can see this being even more sensitive when it comes to discussions regarding the welfare of the child during teem meetings. It is always important to provide your undivided attention during times of conflict and then work together to come to a solution.

    Reply
  • John Tadros says:

    As a service coordinator, when coming across a conflict of ideas, I have to first recognize that the families’ concerns or disagreements are valid. It would be unfair if I disregarded their reasons of being unsatisfied with the IFSP or with my performance. After recognizing that they have a concern, I would paraphrase what they had told me just to make sure that I understood how they feel. I want to make sure that I am on the right page with them. I then will take what I have understood an show what they are dealing with potentially from a different perspective. Keep in mind, while I am doing this, I have to avoid bias, personal opinions, and remain professional even when the conversation becomes difficult. I may even see family members starting arguments with me or with each other. If that is the case, then I redirect them to understanding the main reason why we are here talking. I would remind them that their goal is their child’s success. By nature, the early childhood intervention and IFSP process can be quite stressful. As a result, this stress can lead to conflicts within the family. Therefore, if conflict becomes a constant element within the family, I may suggest applying a support system or even a referral to family counselor to help them work things out.

    Reply
  • Noah Wilson says:

    If I were a service provider, I would first and foremost create an environment where we can have healthy discussion even with disagreement. Ultimately, the reason tensions are running high is because everyone cares deeply. With that as a jumping off point it may be easier to realize we all have the same goal and that together we can formulate a plan that will work best for the child together. Getting multiple perspectives from both family members and other ECI members makes sure that all perspectives are being accounted for and that the more cooperation there is the better off the child will be. However, if a situation does ever get to intense I would reschedule it for another day so everyone could calm down and think about what the true purpose of the meeting is.

    Reply
  • Lindsay Jurica says:

    If I were a service provider, I would try my best to handle conflict in a way that is not harmful to any relationships. I believe that miscommunication is the cause conflict a majority of the time. Therefore, talking about the issue upfront is one way to help resolve the conflict. It is important to not keep any disagreements under the rug and to instead be open about any concerns. In addition, it is important to be mindful of the other person and their thoughts and feelings. Being conscious of this will help to resolve any disagreements.

    Reply
  • Helen Varghese says:

    If I were a service provider faced with a conflict, I think I would try to get the perspective of each team member and family member and speak to them individually, if needed, to resolve the conflict. Because we are all human, emotions can get in the way when we try to resolve conflicts and we might not able to express our true thoughts or feelings so I think it’s important to step away from the situation and listen to everyone’s perspective. If I were a service provider and were to use any of the above strategies to resolve a conflict, I think I would try to listen and understand what the issue or concern really is. It can be difficult when you don’t know the cause of an issue and two people might think they know why the other is upset but no one will really be sure if there is no communication. Therefore, I think it’s really important to hear what a family’s true concern might be or what a service provider’s concern might be so that everyone can work together to solve the real issue and work to make the child and the family’s experience go smoothly.

    Reply
  • Diana Panameno says:

    The strategies I would use as a service coordinator when facing a conflict first and foremost would be to keep the main goal and the purpose of the IFSP team very present. In knowing what we, as a team, are working towards, I believe we are better able to understand why disagreements arise. I say “we” because the child’s and family’s success is not based on one profession or any one individual. It is an interrelated system in which each individual brings a very critical piece of information or skills-based approach to the IFSP team and IFSP outcomes. So, if I were a service provider when faced with a conflict or difficult situation, I would make sure to discuss ways to handle issues as a team because it’s an opportunity to understand how the concerns of each team member has the potential to affect the child’s and family’s outcome, whether positive or negative.

    Reply
  • Jenieve Chapa says:

    Some strategies I use when facing conflict is making sure that everyone’s side, point of view, and suggestions are heard. I believe this can be respectfully done and is necessary to eliminate any confusion or misunderstandings. I also make sure to be considerate and try to understand why a certain perspective is important to the person. A strategy I would use that was mentioned in the article is to take a break and reschedule the IFSP meeting. I agree that it gives each person the chance to get the facts straight, and I believe a later meeting will give the team members enough time to calm down and consider how they will convey their concerns and suggestions.

    Reply
    • Yes, sometimes making the decision to reschedule can be a hard one “in the moment” because of challenges with team members’ schedules but as you said, that pause may make for a much more productive meeting next time. Thanks Jenieve!

      Reply
  • Kalina Lemaire says:

    Hi Dana

    One of the two biggest ways that I address conflict is actually through two of the strategies that you addressed above. First, having a direct and professional conversation with the other party involved is so crucial. All opinions/sides are able to be properly communicated and it is very important that both parties feel like they were able to share their side. Secondly, taking a step back from a situation of disagreement to think about both your own side/opinion and the other’s is so important. Emotions can take the wheel sometimes in disagreements which creates a lack on understand and communication between both parties. Sometimes it is best to revisit the topic after taking time to rethink the topic and find the most efficient way to tackle the issue. Especially in the field of IFSP and service coordinators emotions run high through the family almost every day, having patience and understanding when entering into a situation as so can ensure effective communication and outcomes.

    Reply
  • Alex Posner says:

    Hi Dana!

    When facing conflicts, it is important to listen to all sides of the situation. This way, everyone feels heard and understood. If presented a team issue I would make sure to talk to each party and then reconvene as a group after. This eliminates the opportunity for either party to feel uncomfortable stating how they feel. From there, the issue needs to be defined, all concerns need to be heard, and a resolution needs to be found. Of course, this is easier said than done but with the right strategies a fair resolution would be achieved. I personally would make it a point to not give the answer to the provider or family member. This would ensure that they would then have the tools to figure something like this out for themselves in the future. Working through the issue as a team ensures that everyone participates in the process of finding a solution in a fair way.

    Reply
  • Kirsten Ellis says:

    There are many strategies that I use when faced with a problem. These include stepping away from the task at hand to clear my mind, asking others for their outside opinion, as well as trying to obtain all the knowledge about whatever situation is at hand so that I can make an informed decision or conclusion. One situation where these strategies would be used is if family members within the same family do not particularly agree on IFSP outcomes for the child in question. Another may be that the family is so overwhelmed that it is hard for them to make a decision because of other aspects of their life beings stressful at the moment.

    Reply
  • Dede Nguyen says:

    Hi Dana,
    I think your suggestions for conflict management between the families and service providers are great and also work well in situations outside of ECI. I think as a service coordinator, one must remain neutral in these situations but also make sure that both parties feel heard and supported. By having a direct and professional conversation with each party involved, one is able to understand how they feel and think of solutions on how to make everyone happy. Taking a step back from the conflict is also good in that it prevents tensions from flaring and allows for both parties to sit on their feelings and think of ways to articulate them that are productive.

    Reply
  • Rachel Barnes says:

    I really enjoyed reading this blog post and the especially enjoyed reading the joys and rewards of being a IFSP service coordinator. When I am faced with conflict I usually take a day or so to critically think about the situation at hand, and then decide how to appropriately proceed. Confronting the situation in a respectful and considerate manner is key to finding a solution. A strategy I might use would be to “discuss ways to handle as a team”. This strategy is important in all conflict resolution because it instills confidence in both parties that together, we can come up with a solution.

    Reply
  • Ana says:

    Hi Dana!

    If I were a service provider facing conflict with a family, my goal would be to actively listen to the family’s concerns and provide a space where everyone is heard. Communication is crucial in order to resolve conflict. Miscommunication may be a factor in the rise of this conflict, so giving time for everyone to share their perspective on the situation may clarify key information that may have been missed. I would also need to remind myself to be more open-minded about the situation and consider any biases that I may have that may cloud my judgment on the matter. With patience, communication, and an open-mind, a healthy discussion may be shared in order to come to a conclusion that works best for everyone.

    Reply
  • Sophie says:

    Thank you so much for this blog post. I feel like we don’t hear about the harder parts of being a service coordinator as often as we hear about the better parts of the job. This can often lead to missed expectations and then causes the job to be harder towards the beginning because it is shocking. If I were in the middle of the disagreement I would set up meetings with each of the professionals on the team, along with the child’s caregivers to listen to what their individual goals are. Then, I would schedule a meeting for the team to share their ideas and verbalize what they have been feeling. I would go on to remind them that the team’s goal is for the child to progress. I think communicating professionally and clearly is most important in these tough situations.

    Reply
  • Ashley Mendenhall says:

    When facing conflict in general I think listening is the most important aspect so that I could understand the hurt and pain behind the other person’s argument and so that I could know how to tackle the situation. When facing a difficult conversations discussing the issue as a team is the best way I would approach the situation to use an array of perspectives. Similarly, I would approach it with an unbiased angle and receive the most information I could so that I would be able to handle the conflict with the child’s interest at the heart.

    Reply
  • Victoria Garfinkel says:

    Hi Kimberly,

    I enjoyed reading your blog post. One of the strategies I would use when facing conflicts is communication. I would ask the parent and others on my team what can be done to improve the current situation. I believe good communication is key to solving any problem and really listening to what the parents concerns / frustrations are may help alleviate the problem. I would use your strategy of helping the parent come to their own conclusion and handle their own situation because this way the parent would feel more in control. As you stated, the service coordinator should only facilitate and the parent should focus on leading the process. In making sure the parent takes control, it might help alleviate conflict.

    Reply
  • Amy Trevino says:

    When facing conflict, I find that addressing the issue(s) in private is important. Often, addressing the issue privately allows all parties involved to express their feelings and intentions in a safe environment without judgement from outside parties. Additionally, I think that active listening by repeating back your understanding of the issues and statements is important. In this manner you clarify your own understanding and give the other person or people an opportunity to correct any misinterpretations. Much like what was mentioned, you “make sure you understand what the issue or concern really is” and you can act accordingly.

    Reply
  • Nicolas Ballivian says:

    As a people pleaser who used to dread just the thought of conflict, I have slowly understood that being honest and direct when faced with conflict will most often times achieve the outcomes you desire. And when working with families, a service coordinator that has great interpersonal skills in the face of conflict will most likely achieve the greatest results. I believe this means making the family feel valued and respected by taking their perspective into account and having both parties explain and analyze their point of view. Most importantly, child outcomes are key when conflicted in regards to approaches, because the parents and service coordinator need to always take the child’s main needs into account.

    Reply
  • Jason Tran says:

    When facing conflicts such as that with the family or team members, I would first look to make sure everyone is educated on the sequence and important it is for the child’s development that they proceed with this route. Furthermore, I would want to hear the perspective of the opposing party and see why they my disagree and I would want the opposing party to know why I believe my suggestion is important. As a result, I would come up with a solution where both parties are satisfied and the procedure for the child is continued.

    Reply
  • Taylor Ribar says:

    I love the idea of proactively asking about any changes that could be causing difficulties for the family or for the routine. I think one of the most important parts of conflict resolution is coming from a perspective of truly wanting to understand the person on the other side and then making sure the line of communication is open so that you can work as a team to find a solution.

    Reply
  • Estefany Mora says:

    What strategies do you use when facing conflicts?

    What I would do when facing conflict is above all maintain calm. Once I am calm, I think the next step would be to foster open communication with the family so viewpoints could be shared honestly. Once that is done, I would try to find a solution in which all parties could agree on and move forward with that one.

    How might you implement one of the above strategies when faced with a conflict or difficult situation?

    I think when conflict arises, it is extremely important as a service coordinator to really understand what the issue and concern is. In order to reach a solution, we would need to have that open communication so we can truly understand one another and see what is going on. So, when conflict arises, I would first allow everyone to voice their opinion and concerns. Once everyone has said their share, we can move on to thinking about solutions we can all embark on together.

    Reply
  • Miki Haruki says:

    If I was a service coordinator and met with a conflict, I would first make sure I understand the conflict. I would then listen to as many perspectives as possible and sit down with the family to talk about their priorities in coming up with a plan. I feel that by having the family be a part of the problem-solving process makes it easier for families to voice their opinions and needs and also help them grow to be independent when approaching a problem even without a service provider. Additionally, I believe it would be important for the service provider to help the families recognize the role of an IFSP and that it is a team effort where disagreements can happen but it is important to see differing opinions and respect each other.

    Reply
  • Leslie Nguyen says:

    Hello! I am taking a course called Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention. If I was a service provider and was faced with conflict I would first make sure to remain calm and collected. After doing so, I would try to understand every aspect of the conflict. This would allow me to look up resources on how to help the family further and find a solution. The importance of fostering the family’s independence with problem-solving and getting their children’s needs met without me present is something I would aim to fulfill.

    Reply
  • Madeline K. says:

    When facing conflict, I have always found it reasonable to allow everyone a chance to say their side. That way, each person has a chance to be heard and have a voice. A suggestion I would implement above as a service provider is “in cases where there are disagreements among team members and a decision is unable to be reached, it is alright to end an IFSP meeting, take a break and reschedule the IFSP meeting for another day.” Breaks can be a good thing and allow each person to self-reflect and come back to recollect conversation when everyone has had time to cool down and think.

    Reply
  • Grace Blumenfeld says:

    As a member of the Early Childhood Intervention course, I can imagine how difficult overcoming conflicts can be in a family-oriented occupation. Active listening is crucial while interacting with the families, and listening is also important to resolving or mitigating conflicts. Understanding the situation at hand, the problem of interest, and feasible solutions would be my first step as a service coordinator when dealing with conflicts. Once I can comprehend the overall situation, giving people time to think of and accept a solution will improve discussions in which there are disagreements. An example of implementing one of the strategies mentioned in the blog is discussing the solutions with the family and hearing their concerns. Once this is done, I could choose a solution and explain it in a way that will simultaneously help the family while alleviating any of their fears.

    Reply
  • Gabriela O. says:

    I agree with the strategy that it is important to be able to address changes, positive or negative, with the child’s family. Maintaining an open line of communication with the family is critical, particularly when addressing areas for improvement, as any changes will benefit the child. This could be linked to the strategy of attempting to really comprehend the family’s concern. Using a combination of these methods emphasizes understanding the problem and feeling comfortable discussing it with the family, allows the service coordinator to respond appropriately and provide the required knowledge, assistance, or resources to help the family solve or better understand the issue, and, eventually, help the child toward their IFSP outcomes.

    Reply
  • Margaret Simmons says:

    If I were a team member, in order to solve any conflicts, I would remind everyone involved that we are a team, working to better the life of the child and family. I would be professional, but also remind the team that everyone has the option to have their voice heard. Sometimes, the IFSP meeting would just have to be rescheduled so everyone can calm down, regroup, and decide what is most important to each team member.

    Reply
  • Claire Eckardt says:

    I tend to take a direct approach when facing conflict, which I believe would be beneficial when working within the EIS field. It’s important to remember that caregivers are part of the team and as such should be treated as equals. I can see how disagreements could arise with this kind of topic because of the sensitive nature of deciding how to best help a child. However, I believe that emphasizing the need to handle issues as a team as well as the ability to step away from disagreements to recoup would be extremely beneficial for the process.

    Reply
  • Mac Clapper says:

    I think an important part of this post is the idea that service coordinators should help empower families to solve issues themselves. Families should be able to adapt to large issues, and the service coordinators can help provide tools. However, ECI ends and families will still have difficult situations after ECI. Thus, helping the family think of strategies to overcome difficult situations is much more important than attempting to fix the problem yourself.

    Reply
  • Asha Gomez says:

    I like the efficiency in this approach. Having a direct and open conversation can bring to light any conflict or areas of tension for the family so issues can be dealt with. Remember key ideas in this article such as understanding and discussing are major components in conflict resolution. Being prepared for difficult situations is a critical skill. If I was a service coordinator, I would remind myself and my team to remain calm, clear-headed, and empathetic when meeting with the family. Early on it is essential to create a relationship with the family where they feel comfortable to come forward with any issues they have without fear of judgement. I would try to understand all sides in a disagreement.

    Reply
  • Cody Spencer says:

    When faced with conflict, I like to gather my thoughts while being alone. I feel like this gives me time and a safe space to calm down and gather what is going on and how every party is feeling. I then, usually, decide whether or not to confront the conflict. A suggestion mentioned that I would implement if I was a service provider would be to “discuss ways to handle issues as a team.” I would do so by gathering as a group and hearing all sides of the story. This makes sure that every team member involved is comfortable with the outcomes.

    Reply
  • Jennifer Castillo says:

    Whenever I’m facing a conflict with a colleague I always like to speak my side and why I think _____, then I give them time to explain their side and their reasoning behind their opposition (without interrupting them). I make sure both points are made that way the other person knows where Im coming from and vice versa. One of the strategies mentioned above that I could implement in a conflict whenever a decision can’t be made is rescheduling the meeting for another day, I believe that taking a break will be good for the both of us, that way we can further think about the situation by ourselves. And sometimes people can get pretty mad during a conflict, and a conflict will never be resolved if anger is in the way.

    Reply
  • Yingying Zhen says:

    I would remain calm and unbiased, and get everyone’s opinions. There will not be a perfect solution, but after listening to everyone’s opinion, we can get to a near perfect solution for this child. Also always allow breaks in between to allow everyone to calm down and reflect on themself.

    Reply
  • Karen Gonzalez says:

    If I were a service provider facing conflicts, I would want to hear the various perspectives of each individual member of the IFSP team. I think it’s important to take into consideration parents’ and other members’ concerns, frustrations, and suggestions and help them establish a mutual agreement. I would implement the strategy of discussing ways to handle issues as a team because I think it’s important for everyone’s voice to be heard. This will ensure that everyone is comfortable, confident, and in accordance with the outcomes. As the post mentions, “helping the family and/or provider figure out how to solve the issue themselves will not only give them skills to handle situations in the future but also empower them to speak out.” Communication is key to solving problems and miscommunication can often be the cause of those problems. As a service coordinator, it’s crucial to help facilitate the discussion in an honest and direct manner and model the ways to come to a resolution.

    Reply
  • I think it’s important to remember that everyone has a unique perspective and everyone deserves to be heard out. I like the idea of meeting with team members individually to make sure everyone feels and is heard. Ending the IFSP meeting and allowing time for these individual meetings would probably be very beneficial.

    Reply

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