If you haven’t sat in a wet spot yet on a visit, the chances are very likely that you will someday. It just comes with the territory of working with infants and toddlers in natural environments. With infants with reflux, potty-training toddlers and little ones roaming the house with sippy cups, family pets, and other …

Knock, knock…wait…knock again…check your watch…knock again…wait…leave a note because no one’s home. This is the third no-show in a row and you drove 35 minutes to get to the home. Sigh. What do you do?

It’s easy to get frustrated when a family no-shows, especially when you see a pattern of missed visits. It’s also easy …

You knock on the door, enter the family’s home and take off your coat. Maybe you take off your shoes, too. And the mother asks, “Can I get you a cup of tea, or a soda, or anything?”
What is your initial response?
Mine was always, “No, thanks. I’m fine.” Then one day I visited with a …

You meet the family of a newborn baby girl who has just been diagnosed with Down syndrome. You ask the baby’s father about how his daughter is doing and he replies that he doesn’t have any concerns because she’s perfect just how she is. He says he thinks she’ll be just fine. His wife fidgets as …

You’re on a first visit with the family of a toddler who is suspected of having an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You greet the mother and try to say “hi” to the child, but he wanders away to continue his circuit around the room.  As you watch, he picks up toys and drops them, dances in front …

You’re on an intervention visit and the mother asks you if you also work with her neighbor’s child. She says she’s noticed your car in their driveway and goes on to tell you what she knows about that family. Or maybe you’re talking with a friend of yours who mentions a family who is in your program.
What do you …

You’ve been in a home working with a family for about 15 minutes when the child’s older brother walks into the room, sneezes on you, and sits on your lap. The child feels like he has a fever, has very runny nose and is coughing. The mother tells you that he’s been sick since yesterday and …

How many times has this happened to you? You arrive for your EI visit to a family’s home and find that the large screen TV is on and a favorite show is airing. Perhaps it is a beloved cartoon for the child, or maybe it is the mother’s favorite talk show host. Is the father …

We’ve all had that visit…the one where we knock on the door for the first time and the family is less than pleased to see us arrive. Or the visit where, after we arrive, the parent leaves us in the living room and doesn’t reappear for 10 minutes. Or, the visit where the parent is …

Early interventionists know service coordinators wear several hats. We are advocators, coordinators, problem solvers, and mediators.   Service coordinators are leaders in the IFSP process and active listeners to parents and providers.   We have to be creative and sometimes think outside the box to help children reach their greatest potential.

Service coordination has many rewards and challenges …